jerkidiot:

my mom always throws old clothes that she has nothing to do with in my closet, and whenever i call her out on it, she says “i have never done that, all of the clothes in your closet are yours”

image

are you sure mom

image

are you sure these are my clothes

(via marcelswhore)

darecrow:

Imagine being pregnant in new york

and your husband gets a cab for you and you’re rushing to the hospital when

"wELCOME TO THE CASH CAB"

This > any other scenario

(via marcelswhore)

bookandwords:

can characters stop doing stupid things so I can avoid secondhand embarrassment? please and thank you.

mrmallarme:


The Pool of Tears.

 The sign outside this tent is accompanied by a small box full of smooth black stones. The text instructs you to take one with you as you enter.
 Inside, the tent is dark, the ceiling covered with open black umbrellas, the curving handles hanging down like icicles. 
 The center of the room there is a pool. A pond enclosed within a black stone wall that is surrounded by white gravel. 
 The air carries the salty tinge of the ocean.
 You walk over to the edge to look inside. The gravel crunches beneath your feet. 
 It is shallow, but it is glowing. A shimmering, shifting light cascades up through the surface of the water. A soft radiance, enough to illuminate the pool and the stones that sit at the bottom. Hundreds of stones, each identical to the one you hold in your hand. The light beneath filters through the spaces between the stones. 
 Reflections ripple around the room, making it appear as though the entire tent is underwater.
 You sit on the wall, turning your back stone over and over in your fingers.
 The stillness of the tent becomes a quiet melancholy. 
 Memories begin to creep forward from hidden corners of your mind. Passing disappointments. Lost chances and lost causes. Heartbreaks and pain and desolate, horrible loneliness. 
 Sorrows you thought long forgotten mingle with still-fresh wounds. 
 The stone feels heavier in your hand.
 When you drop it in the pool to join the rest of the stones, you feel lighter. As though you have released something more than a smooth polished piece of rock.

mrmallarme:

The Pool of Tears.

 The sign outside this tent is accompanied by a small box full of smooth black stones. The text instructs you to take one with you as you enter.

 Inside, the tent is dark, the ceiling covered with open black umbrellas, the curving handles hanging down like icicles. 

 The center of the room there is a pool. A pond enclosed within a black stone wall that is surrounded by white gravel. 

 The air carries the salty tinge of the ocean.

 You walk over to the edge to look inside. The gravel crunches beneath your feet. 

 It is shallow, but it is glowing. A shimmering, shifting light cascades up through the surface of the water. A soft radiance, enough to illuminate the pool and the stones that sit at the bottom. Hundreds of stones, each identical to the one you hold in your hand. The light beneath filters through the spaces between the stones. 

 Reflections ripple around the room, making it appear as though the entire tent is underwater.

 You sit on the wall, turning your back stone over and over in your fingers.

 The stillness of the tent becomes a quiet melancholy. 

 Memories begin to creep forward from hidden corners of your mind. Passing disappointments. Lost chances and lost causes. Heartbreaks and pain and desolate, horrible loneliness. 

 Sorrows you thought long forgotten mingle with still-fresh wounds. 

 The stone feels heavier in your hand.

 When you drop it in the pool to join the rest of the stones, you feel lighter. As though you have released something more than a smooth polished piece of rock.

"All she needed was for everyone, everything to just stop and give her a chance to catch up."
- Note to Self, Alina Simone (via creatingaquietmind)